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To download as a pdf please click Safeguarding Adults Partnership Board Annual Report 2019-2020

Foreword

We are pleased to present the Annual Report of the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Safeguarding Adults Board for 2019-20. The Board, a requirement of the Care Act 2014, is made up of three Statutory Partners; Local Authority, NHS Clinical Commissioning Group and Police, together with several key partners, representing a wide range of agencies and community groups.

The annual report outlines the key activities and achievements of the Board and its partners over the last year. The multi-agency safeguarding training has continued to develop and grow, front line practitioners voices have been captured through a series of consultation surveys and forums.  One of the key roles of the Board is to ensure that partners continue to work together effectively. This has been a key area of focus for the Board throughout 2019/20 and will continue to be so. All of this work is underpinned by the principles of making safeguarding personal.

Safeguarding is about people, their wishes, aspirations and needs. The partnership has been active in identifying and learning lessons through the Safeguarding Adult Review sub group. Although we have not published any safeguarding adult’s reviews within the time period covered by this review, a lot of activity has taken place and briefings, workshops and learning lessons training has been delivered.

Over the last 12 months the Safeguarding landscape has continued to be complex, presenting many new challenges in addition to those faced day-to-day. The final quarter of the year has been dominated by the COVID crisis and its impact, globally, nationally and locally. Whilst the virus has affected all areas of society, it has had a significant impact on our older, more vulnerable community, some of whom receive care and support, often in care homes or domiciliary care. This report focuses on the period 1st April 2019- 31st March 2020, when Covid was at the start of the outbreak.  We wanted to assure people that throughout the Covid pandemic to date, the Board has continued to work closely with both statutory and wider partners to scrutinise how safeguarding issues are addressed, gain reassurance that they were dealt with appropriately and provide a forum for sharing best practice across the partnership. It has also ensured that safeguarding adults remains a key focus for across the County.

Finally, we would like to thank all members of the Board, particularly the chairs of the sub-groups, for their professionalism, commitment and support. We would also like to say thank you to all agencies and front line staff for the incredible work that they do to keep adults safe from abuse and neglect.  Thank you to Jo Procter and her staff in the Independent Safeguarding Partnership Service for their hard work and support.

Wendi Ogle-WelbournCarol AndersonVicki Evans
Executive Director, People & CommunitiesChief NurseAssistant Chief Constable
   

About the Board

Leadership and Governance

Our Annual Report for 2018/19 detailed a number of changes within the safeguarding arena for both children and adults at risk.  These changes led to the creation of a single Safeguarding Children’s Board and a single Safeguarding Adults Board across the local authority areas of Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.   Further details on these changes can be found here: https://safeguardingcambspeterborough.org.uk/about-the-partnership-board/

The structure combines the governance arrangements at a senior level to look at safeguarding arrangements holistically across both the children’s and adults safeguarding arena.

The Executive Safeguarding Partnership Board has maintained its links with other groups and boards who impact on child and adult services this year.  These are illustrated in Figure 1.  This ensures that all aspects of safeguarding are taken into account by the other statutory boards and there is a co-ordinated and consistent approach. These links mean that safeguarding vulnerable people remains on the agenda across the statutory and strategic partnership and is a continuing consideration for all members.

Image 1 – Links to other statutory boards

Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Safeguarding Partnership Boards

The two Safeguarding Partnership Boards (adults and children’s) sit below the Executive Safeguarding Partnership Board (see Figure 2). The Safeguarding Partnership Boards are responsible for progressing the Executive Safeguarding Partnerships Board’s business priorities through the business plan; authorising the policy, process, strategy and guidance to effectively safeguard children and adults at risk.  The two Safeguarding Partnership Boards scrutinise, challenge and maintain an overview of the state of children’s and adults safeguarding in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough; undertaken through quality assurance activity, learning and development programmes and commissioning and overseeing Child Safeguarding Practice Reviews / Safeguarding Adult Reviews / multi-agency reviews.  The Safeguarding Partnership Boards have wider partner membership including probation, health providers, Healthwatch, education, voluntary sector, faith communities and housing.  A full list can be found in Appendix 1.

To support the two (adults and children’s) Partnership Safeguarding Boards are a range of sub groups and task and finish groups. These groups are responsible for a range of areas, including policies, training, consultation and quality assurance. The function of these groups are detailed below.

  • Two consultation and development forums (one for adults and one for children’s) responsible for securing the “voice” of practitioners and ensuring that learning is used to inform and improve practice.
  • Two Quality and Effectiveness Groups (QEG), one for adults and for children’s. Chaired by the Head of Service for the Safeguarding Partnership Boards, the group’s membership includes senior managers from the safeguarding partners and other relevant agencies that have responsibility for safeguarding performance within their organisation. These groups scrutinise safeguarding effectiveness and co-ordinate improvement activity by; quality assurance activity (both single and multi-agency), performance management information and overseeing of action plans.
  • A single countywide Children’s Case Review Group, that examines children’s cases and a countywide Safeguarding Adults Review group which deals with adult’s case reviews.
  • A single countywide Training Subgroup monitors both multi-agency and single agency training offered by the safeguarding partners.
  • Task and finish groups are established to progress themed areas, e.g. child sexual abuse, criminal exploitation. Each group is responsible for producing resource packs for practitioners which include strategies/ guidance, training, leaflets and tools.
  • The structure also includes those forums who have a “dotted line” to the Safeguarding Boards (Education Safeguarding Group, Child Protection Information Network).

Independent Safeguarding Partnership Service

The work of the various Boards and groups within the governance arrangements is overseen by the Independent Safeguarding Partnership Service. The service is managed by the Head of Service and includes roles that cover both adults and children’s agendas. Some of the roles are specialised in quality assurance and improvement, exploitation, training, communication and there are more general adult and children’s leads and dedicated administrative roles. The service ensures that there is robust, countywide independent scrutiny and oversight of multi-agency practice.

Image 2 – Diagram showing the structure of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Safeguarding Partnership Board

Work of the Safeguarding Partnership Board

Board Priorities 2019-2021

The Adult Safeguarding Partnership Board (ASPB) has a 2 year strategic plan, with priority areas and a number of aims. The aims listed below are the focus of ASPB for 2019 – 2020.

  • The importance of Making Safeguarding Personal (MSP) is recognised and implemented effectively across agencies
  • Agree and implement pathways for those vulnerable adults considered “at risk”
  • Lessons from SARs/MARs are effectively disseminated and the impact of the learning is evidenced

Making safeguarding personal (MSP)

MSP is a golden thread running throughout everything the board does and is in all of our multi-agency training, resources and audits. Within the multi-agency self-assessment tool there were specific sections relating to making safeguarding personal and agencies scored their services accordingly. Further details can be found later in this report.  All audit activity of the board measures practice against MSP.

Development and Consultation Forums have been set up this year which allow for discussion around the work of safeguarding partner agencies specifically relating to the board priorities.  Each forum focuses on one of the priories and in September 2019, it was making safeguarding personal.  The findings were then presented to both the Quality and Effectiveness Group and the Safeguarding Adult Partnership Board to inform further activity.

A ‘Lived Experience of the Adult’ training pack has been developed this year as a result of learning from the ‘Arthur’ Safeguarding Adult Review.  The learning suggested that practitioners should place greater consideration on what life is like for the individual adult and how they might perceive the support being offered to them.  The pack contains slides, trainers notes and the Lived Experience of the Adult Guidance also launched this year.  Five multi-agency workshops were delivered across the county to introduce and promote this pack.  Following positive feedback, the training pack is available to all safeguarding partners on request and the workshop is now part of the core Workforce Development  Programme.

A training needs survey was completed at the end of 2019 which included specific questions relating to making safeguarding personal training.  This survey was presented to the Training Subgroup in January 2020.   The survey explored the presence of making safeguarding personal principles within single agency training and found that a number of agencies did not have making safeguarding personal principles within their single agency training.  As a result of this survey a ‘Toolbox’ of presentation slides was produced which included information on making safeguarding personal for partner agencies to include within their introductory safeguarding training.  This can be found here: https://www.safeguardingcambspeterborough.org.uk/adults-board/resources-for-practitioners/

The multi-agency self-assessment tool which was undertaken by partner agencies in December 2018 included specific questions on the subject of making safeguarding personal under the heading ‘Empowerment’.  The result of this exercise were fed into other work undertaken in 2019/20 on this area.  Further detail on this exercise can be found later in this report.

A dedicated area on the Safeguarding Partnership Board’s website has been created for the Board’s priority of making safeguarding personal which includes an overview and resources for practitioners.  This page has been viewed 600 times from April 2019 to Mar 2020 and can be found here: https://www.safeguardingcambspeterborough.org.uk/adults-board/information-for-professionals/msp/

The subject of making safeguarding personal has been included within the practitioner workshops delivered this year.  This has included information relating to ‘professional curiosity’ and the lived experience of the adult and the guidance and resources available.

Performance monitoring has been strengthened this year.   Single agency performance is reviewed and monitored by the Quality and Effectiveness Group (QEG).  This process requires partners to present a qualitative report which looks at the following areas:

  • What is working well,
  • What could be improved
  • What each agency is doing to progress the improvements
  • Details of any improvements that require a multi-agency response.
  • Any information which needs to be escalated to the Safeguarding Children’s Partnership Board or Executive Safeguarding Partnership Board

The group have a discussion regarding individual performance relating to the Board’s priorities based on these reports.  Each priority is considered by the group twice a year.  This revised performance reporting process has provided a forum for agencies to work through multi-agency practice issues.  The discussions have led to change in processes and policies.  Where discussions have not resulted in resolving practice issues there is a direct escalation by the chair to the Safeguarding Board.

Pathways for adults ‘at risk’

We want adults and older people to be safe and healthy, to be independent and maximise their potential, and to be supported to make a positive contribution within their community which reciprocally supports them. This requires the partnership to have agreed pathway’s for those vulnerable individuals who agencies consider to be “at risk”.

In April and May 2019 guidance and workshops on the new Multi-Agency Risk Management (MARM) process was launched.  This guidance details an approach to support those adults who:

  • are identified as being in need of care and support
  • have the mental capacity to understand the risks posed to them
  • continue to place themselves at risk of serious harm or death and
  • refuse or are unable to engage with necessary care and support services.

The workshops were attended by 137 professionals.  The guidance can be found here: https://www.safeguardingcambspeterborough.org.uk/adults-board/information-for-professionals/cpsabprocedures/multi-agency-risk-management-guidance/#1_Introduction

The impact of the implementation of the MARM process will be considered in 2020/21 and will be reported upon in the next Annual Report.

As previously mentioned, the Boards priorities are discussed at the Development and Consultation Forums and in 2019, the group looked at pathways for vulnerable adults ‘at risk.’  Feedback was then provided to the Safeguarding adult Partnership Board.  Ongoing discussions within both the Safeguarding Adult Board and jointly with other partnerships boards including the Community Safety Partnership Countywide Board are being held and further detailed will be included within the 2020/21 Annual Report.

A review of multi-agency training was undertaken by the Training Subgroup in late 2019 to ensure that the MARM process is included in all relevant training commissioned or delivered by the board and partner organisations.  In addition questions concerning the MARM process were included within the training needs survey in January 2020.  As a result of these activities and to assist safeguarding partners in including this subject within the single agency training, a practitioner briefing explaining the terms ‘adult at risk’, making safeguarding personal and the MARM titled ‘Who is the adult at risk and the MARM’ has been added to the Resources page on the website: https://www.safeguardingcambspeterborough.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/adult-at-risk-briefing-including-MARM.pdf

The subject of adults ‘at risk’ has been included within the practitioner workshops delivered this year.  This has included information specifically around the tools available for assessment and the MARM process.

As a result of quality assurance activity which was presented to the Quality and Effectiveness Group in 2019, a Safeguarding Glossary was produced.  Discussions at the QEG determined that practitioners are not always aware of the name of particular processes although they do follow those processes in their practice.  It was decided that a dictionary or glossary of a shared common language should be produced to support practitioners in their understanding of terminology.  Substantial work with contribution from all safeguarding partners resulted in the Safeguarding Glossary which contains agreed partnership language and interpretation and includes ‘Adult at Risk’.  It can be found here https://www.safeguardingcambspeterborough.org.uk/adults-board/glossary-of-safeguarding-adult-terms/

Performance monitoring has been strengthened this year.   Single agency performance is reviewed and monitored by the Quality and Effectiveness Group (QEG).  This process requires partners to present a qualitative report which looks at the following areas:

  • What is working well,
  • What could be improved
  • What each agency is doing to progress the improvements
  • Details of any improvements that require a multi-agency response.
  • Any information which needs to be escalated to the Safeguarding Children’s Partnership Board or Executive Safeguarding Partnership Board

The group have a discussion regarding individual performance relating to the Board’s priorities based on these reports.  Each priority is considered by the group twice a year.  This revised performance reporting process has provided a forum for agencies to work through multi-agency practice issues.  The discussions have led to change in processes and policies.  Where discussions have not resulted in resolving practice issues there is a direct escalation by the chair to the Safeguarding Board.

Safeguarding partners set up district led hoarding panels across the county. Membership includes oversight from the Independent Safeguarding Partnership Service.  The need for practitioners to be aware of self-neglect and hoarding has been recognised and multi-agency training has been developed and delivered across the partnership.

Between January and December 2019, a task and finish group was set up to consider access to the Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC) for vulnerable adults who are victims of sexual violence.  Sexual violence and complex needs plan was completed and as a result of this group the process of access to the SARC by vulnerable adults was changed to accommodate their needs and facilitate easier access.  Easy read leaflets were also developed.

Throughout the year there was continued oversight of the Street Sex Workers Group which aims to support both adults and vulnerable adults at risk.

Safeguarding Adult Reviews (SARs)

Under the 2014 Care Act, Safeguarding Adults Boards are responsible for Safeguarding Adults Reviews (SARs). The purpose of SARs in the statutory guidance is to ‘promote effective learning and improvement action to prevent future deaths or serious harm occurring again’. The aim is that lessons can be learned from the case and for those lessons to be applied to future cases to prevent similar harm re-occurring.

In 2019/20 five cases were referred to the Safeguarding Adult Review Panel for consideration and progressed to a SAR.  These had not been completed within the timescale of this Annual Report.

The Care Act 2014 states that lessons learnt should be published in the Annual Report following the conclusion of the review.  These lessons will be published in the 2020/21 Annual Report following the final sign off by the Safeguarding Partnership Board.

Although these reviews are not yet completed it is possible to say that themes of domestic abuse, coercion and control and self-neglect (linked with alcohol misuse and brain injury) have been identified and will be explored in the reports.

The number of reviews undertaken by the partnership is high, and the work needed to progress these reviews is demanding; the sub-group has looked for ways to get to the final report stage more quickly, by using different methods, such as practitioner events to gather information, and running two panel events on the same day to save time and travel for members.  However parallel investigations and a need to ensure a quality report at the end of the process will inevitably mean the process can be lengthy in some cases.

Thematic Review of SARs

In addition to the reviews outlined above which have been undertaken this year, a thematic review of previous SARs was also completed.

This report considered the professional themes found within Safeguarding Adult Review’s (SARs) undertaken from 2011 to 2018 across the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Safeguarding Adult Boards, with a view to identifying any local practitioner themes that should be considered, for future learning and dissemination to partners for implementing into safeguarding adults at risk practice.

The report detailed that there are a number of recurring professional themes, in the majority of the 10 SARs analysed. In 100% of SAR’s the top themes were identified as professionals not recording their practice and either failing to or inadequately complete assessments and assessments of risk. These findings are similar to the national research on SARs.

Following discussion when the report was presented at the QEG, it was determined that follow up activity should be completed which focussed on those reviews which were undertaken following the implementation of the Care Act 2014.  This activity will also look at the recommendations and actions plans for those cases and consider how practice might have changed since 2014.  This report in underway and the findings will be presented in the 2020/21 Annual Report.

Embedding the Learning

An Action Plan of recommendations from all completed SARs sits with the SAR subgroup for monitoring and reviewing completion by partner agencies identified within the review.

When a SAR is completed, a briefing is prepared highlighting the learning for safeguarding practice across all agencies in an easy to read format.  These can be found the dedicated page for SARs which was set up in January 2020: https://www.safeguardingcambspeterborough.org.uk/adults-board/about-the-adults-board/sars/

In October 2019 the process for implementing learning from case reviews was strengthened following feedback from practitioners and managers at the Development and Consultation Forum.  All SARs now have a practitioners briefing developed and made available on the website, as well as briefings on themes arising from the SARs.  Safeguarding partner agencies include these briefings in single agency training.  In addition, we have put into place workshops that are delivered at the completion of case reviews so that learning can be disseminated across the partnership.  We collate the themes that arise from case reviews and include information relating to these themes in the practitioner workshops and multi-agency training offer.  Further feedback from frontline practitioners has confirmed that these have proved a useful resource.

Future Developments

Safeguarding Adults Practitioner Survey

The Independent Safeguarding Partnership Service has undertaken a practitioner survey, commissioned by the Quality and Effectiveness Group, which sought to explore what professionals know and understand about the areas of practice covered by the current board priorities. The survey also aims to explore how the board’s priorities are being implemented in practice.

The survey opened in February 2020 and the findings will be presented in the 2020/21 Annual Report.

Practice Improvement and Development

Quality Effectiveness Group (QEG)

Monitors the individual and collective effectiveness of the Adult Safeguarding Partnership Board partners and has a strong quality assurance function undertaking audits, focus groups and surveys. The annual themed audit programme (quality assurance planner) includes both single and multi-agency audits and are linked to the board’s priorities. QEG advises and supports the board in achieving the highest safeguarding standards and promoting the safeguarding of adults at risk across Peterborough and Cambridgeshire by evaluation and continuous improvement. During the twelve months covered by this report, alongside the thematic review of SARs, the following audit activity has taken place:

Multi-agency Self-Assessment and Practitioner Survey

In 2019 a second tranche of agencies undertook the multi-agency self-assessment tool.  The tool was completed alongside a practitioner survey with questions on similar areas of safeguarding, the aim of which was to correlate the findings of the two activities.

The report findings are summarised within the following themes and challenges:

  • Embedding safeguarding policies/procedures: there were many policies and procedures available to staff. However, it is not clear that all policies and procedures are up to date
  • Whistleblowing: agencies need to explore how to make this policy more accessible for staff and to record outcomes
  • Cultural competence: there was very little in terms of evidence about cultural competence and an understanding of what good practice looks like within this area.
  • Information sharing. there is still much work to do on information sharing and working together to safeguard adults at risk.
  • The voice of the adult: as professionals we need to find out what ‘the lived experience’ of the adult at risk is like either by asking them, speaking to their family/carers or making observations.
  • Safeguarding Adults: we need to do more to promote what is an adult at risk and how to safeguard them.

As a result of feedback from agencies the format and content of the self-assessment tool has been revised and is now focussing on the SAB priority areas.

At the conclusion of all audit activity a briefing is prepared highlighting the implications for safeguarding practice across all agencies in terms of roles and responsibilities for safeguarding the adult at risk.  Action against these areas has been identified and progressed through QEG and will be reported on the 2020/21 Annual Report.

The learning for practice is cascaded through the Safeguarding Board workshops and professional briefings on the Safeguarding Partnership Board’s website.

Performance monitoring has been strengthened this year.   Single agency performance is reviewed and monitored by the Quality and Effectiveness Group (QEG).  This process requires partners to present a qualitative report which looks at the following areas:

  • What is working well,
  • What could be improved
  • What each agency is doing to progress the improvements
  • Details of any improvements that require a multi-agency response.
  • Any information which needs to be escalated to the Safeguarding Children’s Partnership Board or Executive Safeguarding Partnership Board

The group have a discussion regarding individual performance relating to the Board’s priorities based on these reports.  Each priority is considered by the group twice a year.  This revised performance reporting process has provided a forum for agencies to work through multi-agency practice issues.  The discussions have led to change in processes and policies.  Where discussions have not resulted in resolving practice issues there is a direct escalation by the chair to the Safeguarding Board.

Multi Agency Training and Development

Over the twelve months from January 2019 to December 2019, the Safeguarding Adults Partnership Board provided: workshops, training days and single agency training via invitations to speak at other single agency events.

In total there were 652 professionals attended safeguarding adults training which equates to a 55% increase compared to the previous year.

Workshops

Specialist training workshops are a conduit for sharing safeguarding information, localised experiences, networking and are highly regarded by practitioners as an ‘excellent’ training resource.

  • Lessons learned workshops. These workshops provide professionals with the latest research and findings from Cambridgeshire and Peterborough multi-agency audits and Safeguarding Adult Reviews. They also serve as a safeguarding refresher highlighting assessment tools and multi-agency policies, procedures and resources for practitioners to utilise within safeguarding practice.

The workshops this year centred on the findings from the ‘Arthur’ SAR.

  • The Lived Experience of the Adult. A recurring theme within national and local Safeguarding Adult Reviews (SARs), is where professionals fail to ascertain the ‘lived experience of the adult at risk’ either by speaking with them, finding out what they need or from observing the interactions with carers and family members and their living environment. This omission can result in ineffective; assessments, analysis of risk, referrals, planning and a failing to safeguard the adult at risk. A training resource was developed and a number of workshops were held in which 71 professionals attended.
  • Multi-Agency Risk Management Workshop. To launch the new Multi-Agency Risk Management guidance (MARM), five workshops were provided across April and May 2019. The MARM is a multi-agency response designed to protect adults deemed most at risk but are not engaging with agencies. In total 137 professionals attended the workshops.

Training Sessions

Up until mid-March 2020, all training delivered within the Workforce Development Programme was delivered face to face.  All training was then suspended following Government announcements concerning Covid-19.  The developments and innovations in training offered by the Independent Safeguarding Partnership Service will be detailed in next year’s Annual Report.

Training sessions during 2019 were evaluated highly by professionals with 99 % rating, both the delivery of the training and the aims and learning outcomes of the training as being ‘good to excellent’. 99% of attendees said that they would recommend the training to colleagues.

Salient comments from attendees include

  • ‘Thank you for delivering such a good training today. We all know that 70% of the day is about the energy and method of presenting. You knocked it out of the park!’
  • ‘Training cannot be improved – the best training I have been on for MCA’
  • ‘Excellent course all round.  Well presented, audience engaged very well, thank you’
  • ‘Very informative course that has improved my knowledge of online abuse’

 In terms of impact of the training on practice 83 % of practitioners felt that they had learned a lot and that 77% felt that the training was completely relevant to their safeguarding role.

  • Confidence –88% of attendees felt that after the training their confidence had improved.
  • Knowledge- 95% of attendees felt that after the training their knowledge had improved
  • Skills and Practice- 87% of attendees felt that after the training their practice skills had improved

Strategies for Affecting Positive Change training and resource packs were made available to both the children’s and adults workforces in 2019/20.  These resources focussed on improving practitioners confidence on having difficult conversation with service users and received positive feedback.

A training needs survey was undertaken within the timescale of this Annual Report.  Training leads within partner agencies were asked to consider whether the subjects of each of the Board’s priorities: making safeguarding personal, pathways for adults ‘at risk’ and learning from Safeguarding Adult Reviews has been embedded into their safeguarding training. Results of this survey will be triangulated with the results of the section 11 activity and practitioner survey and reported on in the 2020/21 Annual Report.

Single Agency Training

In 2019 Peterborough and Cambridgeshire Adult Safeguarding Partnership Board developed and implemented a process for checking and making sure that partner agencies training is robust enough for the adult safeguarding workforce. Endorsement of training ensures that the safeguarding adults at risk training is; up to date, fit for purpose (aimed at different job roles and levels), has all of the local and national safeguarding messages and contains lessons from serious adult reviews. To aid this process there are a set of; training principals, a competency checklist and a full description of the groups of people that adult safeguarding training is aimed at. Up until April 2020, a total of 4 courses have been endorsed successfully.  Progress on the endorsement process will be detailed in the 2020/21 annual report.

Raising awareness of the role of the CSPB and safeguarding issues across communities

Promoting awareness is an ongoing activity held throughout the year by the board and its members.

Over the past 12 months, the Safeguarding Board website has been further developed to include briefings, resources and guidance for practitioners across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough and had been viewed 215,000 times by 77,000 users.

The Safeguarding Partnership Board also continues to use social media to raise awareness of the work of the Board and share messages of local and national importance. During the 12 months, our posts reached approximately 21,000 users.

At the time of writing this report COVID-19 had severely impacted professionals’ ways of working including social distancing to prevent the spread of the disease and to support our National Health Service.

As a result, the safeguarding partnership board website has developed a number of resources for professionals and community volunteers, including an informative Covid-19 support page, development of training packs with audio and animation for basic safeguarding,

It is anticipated that some of these new design elements, if successful, will continue throughout 2020 and beyond.

LeDeR – Learning Disability Mortality Reviews

The Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) programme is now in its fourth year, the aim of the programme is to drive improvement in the quality of health and social care services delivery and to help reduce premature mortality and health inequalities for those with learning disabilities.

Safeguarding Adult Boards were identified early in the programme as having a key role in the governance of reviews at local level, and as such Russell Wate Chairs the local LeDeR steering group which aims to meet quarterly. In this period there were a number of challenges in taking the work of the LeDeR programme forward and carrying out reviews; there was no Local Area Contact to coordinate and drive the work, and a lack of trained and available reviewers, many of these issues are now resolved and a plan is in place to get back on track for the 2020-21 reporting period. Further details can be found in the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough LeDeR annual report due to be published soon.

Task and Finish Groups

In addition to the above mentioned activities which are directly related to the Boards priorities, task and finish groups were also set up to complete work relating to pressure ulcers and discharge planning:

Pressure Ulcers

Local guidelines for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, based on national guidelines by the Department of Health,   were developed by a Task and Finish group of safeguarding partners, working on behalf of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Safeguarding Adults Board. The guidelines were adopted by the SAB in July 2019 and can be found here: https://www.safeguardingcambspeterborough.org.uk/adults-board/information-for-professionals/pressure_ulcers/

Discharge Planning

As a result of a safeguarding adult review which remains ongoing, a task and finish group was set up to consider the local challenges around discharge planning.  This work is continuing into 2020/21.

Learning Culture

The Safeguarding Adults and Children Partnership Boards create a culture of openness and facilitate effective and regular challenge to all partner agencies. The Boards do this by the Independent Safeguarding Partnership Service (ISPS) reviewing, scrutinising and challenging local safeguarding arrangements. Findings from Child Safeguarding Practice Reviews, Safeguarding Adult Reviews and audit activity are cascaded back to practitioners and agencies to embed the learning back into practice. The chart below shows how the Safeguarding Partnership Board identifies learning as part of evidence informed practice.

Image 3 – Diagram showing where learning for practice is identified

Appendices

Appendix 1: Safeguarding Adults Partnership Board Partner Agencies

  • Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG)
  • North West Anglia Foundation Trust (NWAFT)
  • Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Foundation Trust (CPFT)
  • Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH)
  • Royal Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
  • Cambridge Community Services (CCS)
  • East of England Ambulance Service
  • 111 Service
  • Cambridgeshire Constabulary
  • Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough
  • Adult Safeguarding representatives, Cambridgeshire County Council
  • Adult Safeguarding representatives, Peterborough City Council
  • City College Peterborough
  • Peterborough Regional College
  • National Probation Service
  • Bedfordshire, Northamptonshire Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire (BeNCH) Community Rehabilitation Company
  • Cross Keys Homes, representing the housing sector
  • Cambridgeshire Fire and Rescue Service
  • Public Health Cambridgeshire County Council
  • Public Health Peterborough City Council
  • Ely Diocese
  • Peterborough Diocese
  • Healthwatch, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough
  • Councillor Peterborough City Council
  • Care Quality Commission (CQC)
  • Age UK
  • Voiceability
  • Department for Work and Pensions
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